How to read your tires:

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Fluid Checks

We do all types of oil changes! Come on in for a service and inspection!

http://hillsideautocanyonlake.com/auto-repair-services/

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Happy Independence Day!

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Thank you, to all the brave men and women who have sacrificed so much for our freedom! #HappyfourthofJuly

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How the air filter works

There is no great mystery to the operation of a car engine. It is essentially an air pump. The pistons and valves work together to draw in and expel air into the combustion chambers as the engine assembly spins round on the crankshaft.

The faster this assembly spins, the more air the engine can draw through. Add fuel to this air pump in the right amount to spark at the correct moment and the internal combustion equation is complete. Power! With so much air being drawn into the engine from the outside, it is of utmost importance this air enters the engine as clean as possible.

It is also important that this flow of air is not restricted in any way. The first line of defence an engine has to fight dirty air with is the air filter. Every molecule of air entering the engine comes through the air filter.

Not only does the air filter scrub the incoming air of harmful particulates, it should also allow the incoming air to flow freely.

Since every bit of dirt in the air flowing into the engine stays in the filtration material the air filter is made from, the air filter must be replaced at regular intervals.

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A dirty and clogged air filter not only loses its ability to clean incoming air, but also offers a restriction to incoming flow. This restriction can result in poor engine performance and loss of efficiency. The good news is that changing an air filter is easy and inexpensive.

Where is it located?
The first step to changing the air filter is to find it. Open the hood and look for either a bread-sized box or merely the most plastic assembly atop the engine. Note locations and types of fasteners, clips, and hold-downs before removing anything. Or simply ask your mechanic. When you pull out the air filter it is typically flat and/or elongated, and is made of a paper element with rubber edges to seal it against the casing. Make sure not to poke anything into the airflow sensor. Air filters are cheap. Replacement airflow sensors are not.

Also take it easy on older, high mileage vehicles. Hard handling can damage intake hoses and tubes made brittle by years of exposure to engine heat. Back in the days of carburetted engines, the air filter was a big doughnut-looking unit that usually sat in a housing on top of the carburettor itself. Changing out the air filter involved removing the housing lid itself and swapping out old for new. Automotive engineers were able to become more flexible with engine intake configurations as fuel systems moved away from carburettors and into fuel injection.

When to change it
So how do you, as a car owner, know when it is time to change the air filter? That all depends, as is often the case with car parts, on how hard the car is driven and under what conditions. If the car sees much use in dusty, harsh conditions (think dirt dusty roads), then more frequent air filter changes are in order. If, on the other hand, you happen to be the typical Kampala driver who only does on home-work-home routine, you can get away with less frequent air filter replacements.

While permanent damage is remote, it is possible if you really neglect the air filter for a long time. If an air filter were sufficiently dirty and damaged, it could allow contaminants into the combustion chamber. In any case, it is a smart and proactive policy to at least inspect the air filter every 10,000km. It costs nothing to look, and it could save you from expensive repairs down the road.

http://www.monitor.co.ug/Business/Auto/How-the-air-filter-works–helps-you/688614-2095580-9t7la6/index.html

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How Anti-Lock Brakes Work

The theory behind anti-lock brakes is simple. A skidding wheel (where the tire contact patch is sliding relative to the road) has less traction than a non-skidding wheel. If you have been stuck on ice, you know that if your wheels are spinning you have no traction. This is because the contact patch is sliding relative to the ice (see Brakes: How Friction Works for more). By keeping the wheels from skidding while you slow down, anti-lock brakes benefit you in two ways: You’ll stop faster, and you’ll be able to steer while you stop.

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Anti-Lock Brake Types

Anti-lock braking systems use different schemes depending on the type of brakes in use. We will refer to them by the number of channels – that is, how many valves that are individually controlled – and the number of speed sensors.

The theory behind anti-lock brakes is simple. A skidding wheel (where the tire contact patch is sliding relative to the road) has less traction than a non-skidding wheel. If you have been stuck on ice, you know that if your wheels are spinning you have no traction. This is because the contact patch is sliding relative to the ice (see Brakes: How Friction Works for more). By keeping the wheels from skidding while you slow down, anti-lock brakes benefit you in two ways: You’ll stop faster, and you’ll be able to steer while you stop.

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/brakes/brake-types/anti-lock-brake1.htm

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Car Maintenance Tips You Can Handle

1. Air Filter

  • Tools You Need: None
  • Time to Complete: 10 minutes
  • Estimated Cost: $10

You need a new air filter for your car every 12 months or 12,000 miles, whichever comes first. You can pay a mechanic and give up your car for a day, or you can replace your air filter at home in about ten minutes.

  1. First, find your filter under the hood of your car. It’s in a black rectangular box with metal clips on the side. Check your owner’s manual if you don’t see it as soon as you pop the hood.
  2. Open up the casing, and check out how the air filter fits inside it. Make a note of which way the filter faces.
  3. Remove the old air filter, and insert the new one exactly how the old one sat.
  4. Remember to close the metal clips when you’re done.

That’s it. For extra savings in the long run, you can extend the life of your new air filter by hitting it with some compressed air to clear out any debris.

2. Windshield Wipers

  • Tools You Need: None
  • Time to Complete: 15 minutes
  • Estimated Cost: $10 to $20
  • I laugh when I visit my local auto parts store and see that they’re having a sale on wiper blades, offering free installation. The free installation only applies if I buy the most expensive blades in the store, so I started changing them on my own. You’ll need new wiper blades after about six months or a year of use. You probably tend to go a little longer before asking your mechanic to change them, but you shouldn’t deal with the danger of streaking while you put off an inconvenient trip to the auto shop.Wiper blade setup differs quite a bit from car to car, so you may have to follow a few different steps according to your owner’s manual. Basically, the process is similar to changing your air filter:
    1. Lift the blades, as if you were washing your windshield by hand, and remove the old blades.
    2. Pay attention to how the old blades connect to the metal arms.
    3. On most models, you’ll see a tab on the underside of the wiper. Push the tab to remove the old blade.
    4. Attach the new blades, being careful not to bend the wiper arms or scratch your windshield. Line everything up and make sure the new ones are secure and tight.

    If you get distracted or just can’t remember exactly how the new blades should fit on the wiper arm, don’t worry. The packaging for the new blades should have a general set of instructions and a helpful diagram.

Read more: http://www.moneycrashers.com/diy-car-maintenance-tips-checklist/

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MONTHLY AUTO MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST

By Deanna Sclar

Part of Auto Repair For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Taking the time for regular under-the-hood vehicle checks will help prevent problems later. Spending 15 minutes every month for an under-the-hood check may prevent 70% of problems that lead to highway breakdowns. Convinced? Then run through the following list once a month or every 1,000 miles:

  • Check the Air Filter
  • Check the accessory belts
  • Check the coolant
  • Check the hoses
  • Check the oil level on the dipstick
  • Check the automatic transmission fluid level on the dipstick
  • Check the brake fluid
  • Check the power-steering fluid
  • Check the windshield wipers and amount of windshield washer fluid
  • Check the wiring
  • Check the tires

Read More: http://www.dummies.com/home-garden/car-repair/monthly-auto-maintenance-checklist/

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